Cabin Fever? Ice Camping Is Your Treatment

Photo by Scott Goodwill on Unsplash

Cabin fever, also known as confinement syndrome, is a type of anxiety or boredom that can occur when a person is confined to a small space for an extended period of time, such as during a long winter or due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It can cause feelings of restlessness, irritability, and difficulty concentrating.

Ice camping, also known as winter camping or snow camping, involves setting up a temporary campsite on a frozen lake or river, and can be a fun and rewarding way to spend time outdoors and break up the monotony of being stuck inside. However, it is important to be well-prepared and take proper safety precautions when ice camping, as the cold and harsh winter conditions can be dangerous. It is recommended to have the necessary equipment and clothing to keep warm and dry, as well as to know how to check the thickness and stability of the ice.

Overall, ice camping can be a good way to alleviate cabin fever and get some fresh air and exercise, but it is important to be mindful of the potential risks and take the necessary precautions.

How to Treat the Winter Disease while camping?

Photo by engin akyurt on Unsplash

There are a few steps you can take to prevent and treat the winter disease (also known as hypothermia) while camping:

Dress in layers:
Wear multiple layers of loose-fitting, lightweight clothing to help trap body heat and keep you warm. Avoid tight clothing, as it can restrict blood flow.

Stay dry:

Wet clothing can increase the risk of hypothermia, so it’s important to stay as dry as possible. Use a waterproof jacket and pants, and bring extra clothes in case your clothes get wet.

Stay warm:

Use a warm sleeping bag and pad, and consider using a sleeping bag liner to add extra insulation. Use a tent with a rain fly to help keep the wind and snow out.

Stay hydrated:

Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and warm. Avoid alcohol, as it can increase the risk of hypothermia.

Stay active:

Engage in physical activity to generate body heat, such as walking or jogging.

Know the signs of hypothermia: These include shivering, confusion, slurred speech, and drowsiness. If you or someone you are with experiences these symptoms, seek medical attention immediately.

It’s also important to be prepared for emergencies and to have a plan in place in case of any unforeseen circumstances. Bring a first aid kit and a means of communication, such as a satellite phone or a two-way radio. Make sure you have a map and know how to use it, and tell someone your plans and when you expect to return.

Photo by David Schultz on Unsplash

Conclusion

In conclusion, ice camping can be a fun and exciting way to alleviate cabin fever and get out of the house during the long winter months. It can provide an opportunity to enjoy the great outdoors, get some fresh air and exercise, and break up the monotony of being stuck inside. However, it is important to be well-prepared and take proper safety precautions when ice camping, as the cold and harsh winter conditions can be dangerous. By dressing in layers, staying dry and warm, staying hydrated and active, and being aware of the signs of hypothermia, you can have a safe and enjoyable ice camping experience.

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Abbot Ace

Editor & Owner at Ice Camping Pro Abbot loves all things travel and outdoors and is a nature-loving, comfy-camping kinda guy. He loves winter camping.